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Margarine vs Butter

With so many margarines in supermarkets it’s becoming harder to identify which products are right for you and your health. Nutrition Australia has created this fact sheet to help take the confusion out of shopping for margarines.

Iodine Facts

Iodine is an essential trace element and an integral component of thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development of tissues and maturation of our bodies. Iodine deficiency is the most common preventable cause of mental retardation in the world; obtaining iodine through the food supply is therefore paramount.

Heart Foundation Summary of Evidence: Antioxidants in food, drinks and supplements for cardiovascular health

The Heart Foundation has released a Summary of Evidence of research undertaken to determine if antioxidants in food, drinks and supplements are effective in maintaining cardiovascular health (CVH) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Heart Foundation Position Statement: Antioxidants in food, drinks and supplements for cardiovascular health

In 2009 the Heart Foundation, along with an expert working group, reviewed the latest scientific evidence relating to fruit and vegetables; tea; coffee; cocoa and chocolate; red wine; and vitamin supplements. This review determined if these foods, drinks and supplements are effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and maintaining cardiovascular health (CVH).

Managing weight

Managing Weight

Physical Activity and Supplements

Surveys across the board show that about 50% of athletes report taking supplements, though what is defined as a supplement is not clear. What is clear is that although many top athletes take supplements, supplementation is not a prerequisite for being the best in your chosen activity, or even for reaching your personal best, since the other 50% of athletes don't use them!! Never the less, some supplements (such as vitamins and minerals) can play a valuable role in a winning diet.

Post-Event Recovery

Refuelling is a key priority in recovery from physical activity. Muscle glycogen storage occurs at a slow rate and it takes about 24 hours for muscles to restore depleted fuel stocks back to their resting levels.

During event - fluid and food intake

Dehydration is a gradual effect. For every increment of fluid loss there is a small rise in your body temperature and heart rate, and an increase in the perception of how hard you are working. Skills and concentration are also impaired. In other words as the fluid deficit grows, there is a continual decline in performance. You may be unaware of small and subtle changes and may only recognise the damage when it becomes extreme. Optimal performance means being at your best, not just escaping serious problems.

The Pre-Event Meal

The pre-competition meal provides a final opportunity to top up the muscle and liver fuel stores. A high-carbohydrate, low fat meal is the best choice. You might like to adapt one of your everyday meals to suit your event timetable, or you may have some special pre-game eating rituals. Larger meals should be consumed 2-4 hours prior to your event whilst lighter snacks can be consumed 1-2 hours beforehand. For events later in the day you might like to combine these strategies.

Fuelling your Body

The fuel requirements for events of up to about 90 minutes in duration can be met by the normal muscle glycogen stores of a well trained individual. (Glycogen is the body's ready source of energy stored in the muscles.) To fuel up, all you need is 24-36 hours of rest or lighter training, and a higher carbohydrate diet. Although a high carbohydrate diet should already be on your menu, you may like to reinforce the focus on "fuel foods" on the day prior to competition. 

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