Children

Kids Brainy Breakfast Ideas

A healthy, nutritious breakfast that provides your kids with adequate energy is a great way to start the day. The best breakfasts should include fruit or vegetables, a dairy product (or alternative) and a wholegrain bread, cereal or grain product. Some may think that preparing and eating a healthy breakfast is time consuming, but this is not necessarily the case.

What's for lunch?

Packing a healthy lunchbox

Children need to eat a variety of foods everyday to be healthy.

Food Activities

Food activities are a great way to teach children about different types of foods, and to involve them in food preparation. There are countless ways that you can use foods to engage children, and here are just a couple of suggestions:

Food and Fitness for Children

Active, growing children require good nutrition to build healthy bodies and to help them be the best they can be. Many attitudes towards food are shaped during early school years, forming the basis for future eating habits. As parents we can help our children build healthy foundations by encouraging a love of good food and good nutrition throughout these years.

Dental health

Good dental health

For good dental health, you need to look after your teeth. Dental diseases such as tooth decay and dental erosion are very common health problems in Australia, but they are largely preventable!

Promoting a higher vegetable intake in children at school

Good food and nutrition is one of the best ways to prevent and manage many of the major lifestyle diseases that affect Australians today. It has been found that a high intake of saturated fat and a low intake of vegetables and fruit are linked to an increased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers and diseases of the eye such as cataract.

Food advertising directed at children

Nutrition Australia asserts that the food intake of children is an important contributor to their present and future health. Childhood obesity has been rapidly increasing with up to 25% of Australian children being overweight or obese. Although some recent research has indicated the rate of increase in childhood overweight and obesity in Australia may now be slowing, the implications for the future health of the young Australians who are overweight or obese are very concerning.

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